Fundraising

The Hallmark of a Great Gift Planner

Gift Planner

A great gift planner will:

  1. Honor Donor Confidences.  Making a gift out of estate assets may touch sensitive concerns regarding personal wealth and family expectations for some donors.  A great gift planner recognizes this and is sensitive to a donor’s concerns.
  2. Provide Information.  The gift planner should be knowledgeable about various gift vehicles and opportunities that best match a donor’s goals and desires.
  3. Meet With Advisors.  Sometimes a gift plan can be confusing and difficult to explain.  A great gift planner is able to discuss the plan in detail with a donor’s advisors so they have a good grasp of what the donor desires.
  4. Coordinate the Gift Plan.  A great gift planner is good at fitting all the puzzle pieces together.  She will help orchestrate the gift process with a checklist of steps and will move the process along so that the donor’s gift giving experience is stress free and enjoyable.
  5. Provide Ongoing Contact.  Once a donor has made a gift, a great gift planner will maintain contact with the donor to ensure that the donor remains connected with the organization throughout the donor’s gift giving cycle.

To request a brochure on our planned giving services call 1-888-206-0066.

REACHING DONORS WHO WANT TO MAKE AN IMPACT

Impact

There are various perceived motives that form the basis of charitable intent. Three prominent economic models that explore altruism include 1) the public goods model, 2) the warm-glow model and 3) impact philanthropy. Many of our strategies focus on theories discussed in Brian Duncan’s “A theory of impact philanthropy”. The impact philanthropy model states that donors who give primarily to make a difference receive utility when their gift causes a direct change or impact on a social condition. These donors enjoy knowing how their gift directly benefited the cause of their concern. A nonprofit organization can increase its level of contributions by focusing its attention to impact donors. Although there are varying motives for giving, impact donors greatly enjoy the opportunity to target their donation because they appreciate seeing the impact of their giving. Conversely, these same donors do not like funding general operations because the use of their donation does not achieve a “direct” impact. For similar reasons, direct impact donors also prefer donating to smaller nonprofit organizations versus larger organizations because they perceive their donation can make a stronger impact. Nonprofit organizations who wish to target impact donors can create sponsoring agreements that showcase specific areas of need, but at the same time reinforce the general needs of the organization. The time and resources spent on attracting impact donors can be extremely beneficial for a nonprofit. Satisfied impact donors are more likely to remain involved with the organization. With the right approach, a nonprofit can also optimize the relationship, generating a charitable lifecycle of giving. For more information on our donor cultivation strategies, contact info@scottpractice.com.

Fundraising Prospect Research Using Analytics

Prospect Research

Nonprofit managers and fundraising professionals acknowledge that effective fundraising has become more complex requiring more time and resources to cultivate sustainable donor relationships. We see the use of analytical technology as a priority for nonprofits interested in developing or strengthening philanthropic relationships. By using analytical technology, a nonprofit organization can collect, analyze and more efficiently use research data to develop better donor cultivation strategies. Research analytical tools, when used properly and ethically, can become fundamental in developing the right donor connections. Through creation of various rating profiles, an organization will have the ability to convert organized data into essential information on a range of variables such as a donor’s interest level, capacity, philanthropic priorities and anecdotal history. This information can be passed on to the organization’s development officer who can in turn better prepare for donor meetings and major gift discussions. The same collection of data can also be used to maintain interaction with key donors while at the same time become more responsive to donor interests. For instance, the organization can host meet and greet events that are especially tailored to specific donor interests discovered through internal donor research. In today’s information driven society, nonprofits who most successfully utilize data analysis techniques within their fundraising strategy will likely be the organizations that continue to thrive and expand. For more information on prospect research, contact us at info@scottpractice.com.